Let’s Talk About It

Let’s Talk About It is a book discussion series centered on themes ranging from women’s autobiography to the cultural importance of South Carolina’s literary heritage. Funded by the SC Humanities and coordinated with assistance from the South Carolina State library, LTAI has long been the backbone of library programming offered by SC Humanities.

Let's Talk About It!

The LTAI groups usually meet every other week to discuss each book in the series. Group discussions can be facilitated by a qualified scholar (a different scholar for each book) or by using the series guide provided with each series. Time, location, scholar(s) and other details are left to the library’s discretion, but SC Humanities has plenty of recommendations to ensure your success.

To get started:
1) View our list of available series to see what piques your interest.
2) Check the availability of your chosen series by requesting the series through KitKeeper via the SC State Library; contact T.J. Wallace if you need any assistance.
3) If you would like to have scholars help lead the book discussions, twice a year your library system can apply for a grant of up to $500 from SC Humanities for scholar honorarium. Simply download the application form. Contact us if you need help finding scholars.

As of Fall 2018, we are asking all participating libraries to check out the series you will request from KitKeeper via the SC State Library; this is helping us keep better track of our books.

If you have any questions, check our FAQ first.


New LTAI Series!

Tragic Affairs Abroad

This mixed-media series pairs books and films about the timeless intersection of romance and tragedy.

The Painted Veil by W. Somerset Maugham
The Painted Veil
(2006 film version)
A Passage to India by E.M. Forster
A Passage to India (1984 film version)
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
Memoirs of a Geisha (2005 film version)
Girl with the Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier
Girl with the Pearl Earring (2003 film version)
The End of the Affair by Graham Greene
The End of the Affair (1955 film version)

How We Got To Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World

Mixed Media Series
Using Steven Johnson’s bestselling book and the accompanying PBS documentary, this series explores the history of innovation over centuries, tracing facets of modern life (refrigeration, clocks, and eyeglass lenses, to name a few) from their creation by hobbyists, amateurs, and entrepreneurs to their unintended historical consequences.

How We Got to Now: Six Innovations that Made the Modern World by Steven Johnson
How We Got to Now with Steven Johnson – PBS documentary (360 minutes)
(Accommodates 50)

Six Suggested sessions, pairing the book section with the appropriate PBS series episode:
“Clean”
“Time”
“Glass”
“Light”
“Cold”
“Sound”


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle – Film Series

Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is an initiative of the National Endowment for the Humanities that uses the power of documentary films to encourage community discussion of America’s civil rights history. NEH partnered with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History to produce this series. The series contains four films.

The Abolitionists (2012)
Slavery by Another Name (2012)
The Loving Story (2011)
Freedom Ride
(2010)


Libraries praise Let’s Talk About It

“We had no adult programming for a number of years. We obtained two of the LTAI programs within one fiscal year, and our adults loved the discussions.”
~Cristi Bade, Kershaw County Library

“The visiting scholars are wonderful and add so much to the book discussion!”
~Dianne Boersma, Berkeley County Library

“Participants enjoyed talking to each other about what they had read, but they seemed especially hungry for the scholar’s information—they were eager for a learning experience.”
~Sarah McMaster, Fairfield County Library

“Modern American Poets: Voices and Visions was a very positive experience for me both as staff of a sponsoring library and as a participant. I was excited to see how enriching the experience was for participants—many of whom were completely unfamiliar with poets such as Wallace Stevens and Elizabeth Bishop.”
~Mary Jo Dawson, ABBE Regional Library System

“We normally do LTAI in the winter, since our snowbirds are more responsive than the locals. They just love Let’s Talk About It!”
~Shelley Ridout, North Myrtle Beach Library

“The one complaint I occasionally receive is that I cut off the discussions too soon.”
~Sara Breibart, Charleston County Library