Poetry Society of South Carolina Fall Season

The Poetry Society of South Carolina will celebrate their 100th anniversary in 2020-2021, and they plan to offer three virtual online readings and six virtual online workshops in September, October, and November 2020. SC Humanities supported these programs with a Fast Track Literary Grant.

SC Poetry Society workshops and readings have previously occurred at venues around the state and been promoted mostly regionally. This fall, due to the COVID pandemic, the events will be online via Zoom and promoted statewide. Readings are open to the public, and workshops are open to members and are geared towards adults who are actively reading and writing poetry. Participants typically vary widely in age from college students to retirees.

The current fall schedule is:

September 11 – 12 – online reading and workshop by Natalie Scenters-Zapico

September 19 – Online workshop by Ray McManus

October 9 – 10 – Online reading and workshop by Erin Adair-Hodges

October 17 – Online workshop by Ed Madden

November 7 – Online workshop by Fred Dings

November 13 – 14 – Online reading and workshop by Laure-Anne Bosselaar

Founded by DuBose Heyward, John Vennett, and Hervey Allen during the Charleston Renaissance, the Poetry Society of South Carolina has been instrumental in both attracting renowned American poets for public readings as well as nurturing poets and an audience for poetry within South Carolina. To register for the readings and workshop or learn more about the organization, visit poetrysocietysc.org.

The mission of SC Humanities is to enrich the cultural and intellectual lives of all South Carolinians. Established in 1973, this 501(c) 3 organization is governed by a volunteer 20-member Board of Directors comprised of community leaders from throughout the state. It presents and/or supports literary initiatives, lectures, exhibits, festivals, publications, oral history projects, videos and other humanities-based experiences that directly or indirectly reach more than 250,000 citizens annually.

Image: Photo by St. Mattox from FreeImages